Fringe: My Aim is True, Slut (R)evolution and Fear Factor: Canine Edition

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The 26th annual Victoria Fringe Festival runs Aug. 23 – Sept. 2 at nine different venues throughout the city. The Fringe brings acts from all over the world to perform their shows. Musical, comedic, heartbreaking and tantalizing shows can all be found at the Fringe. This year also marks the first time that Family Fest has been included: a group of shows at the Langham Court Theatre that are for children and their families. This Fringe Fest appeals to all audiences, so be sure to not miss out.

My Aim is True

Shows: Victoria Event Centre, 1415 Broad St.
Thursday, Aug. 30 @ 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 1 @ 3 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 2 @ 4 p.m.
$9 (plus $5 Fringe Visa Button)

My Aim is True, written by Meghan Bell, a graduate of UVic’s Writing department, presents a young woman’s struggle with the terminal illness of her mother, complete with musical numbers. Alison, named for the Elvis Costello song from his album My Aim is True, desperately tries to take care of her mother and keep a functioning relationship with her boyfriend.

Martlet: Where did you get the idea or inspiration for your play?

Mika Laulainen (director): Meghan Bell wrote the play, but I believe it was the song “Alison,” by Elvis Costello. The lyrics seem to be so romantic but, in reality, they’re just sad, and that intrigued the playwright.

Martlet: If you could sum up your play in a sentence or phrase, what would it be?

ML: What is the most you’d do for love?

Martlet: What is the worst experience you’ve had while performing?

ML: A lady answered her cell phone during our show. Twice!

Martlet: What is the best experience you’ve had while performing?

ML: Having an audience is the most gratifying experience of all.

Martlet: If your character(s) could have actor(s) portray them in a film, who would they choose and why?

ML: Erika Babins plays Alison, our lead character. She would cast Ellen Page in her role.

Slut (R) evolution (no one gets there overnight)

Shows: Victoria Event Centre, 1415 Broad St.
Wednesday, Aug. 29 @ 8:15 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 31 @ 8:15 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 1 @ 1:15 p.m.
$11 (plus $5 Fringe Visa Button)

Cameryn Moore brings slut ( r) evolution (no one gets there overnight) to this year’s Fringe as a follow up to Phone Whore, her show from Fringe 2011. Unlike her last show, slut (r ) evolution deals with Moore’s life previous to her career as the voice on the other end of phone sex.

Martlet: Where did you get the idea or inspiration for your play?

Cameryn Moore: When I began touring my first solo show, Phone Whore, people would sometimes ask me, “How did you get to be the sort of girl who talks with strange men about sex for money?” slut (r)evolution is an artistic response to that question.

Martlet: If you could sum up your play in a sentence or phrase, what would it be?

CM: A thinking person’s sex show.

Martlet: What is the worst experience you’ve had while performing?

CM: Realizing that I forgot a very important prop about five minutes before I needed it.

Martlet: What is the best experience you’ve had while performing?

CM: Having an audience member respond out loud to something in my play and being able to turn my head and look them right in the eye and have a conversation with them that fit perfectly into the show.

Martlet: If your character(s) could have actor(s) portray them in a film, who would they choose and why?

CM: I don’t know who would portray me. I’d want the actor to be close to my size naturally and comfortable in her own skin, and I don’t know any plus-size actors who fit into that category. For real, when I adapt Phone Whore to the screen, I’m going to lobby the director and producers to keep me in it.

Fear Factor: Canine Edition

Shows: VCM Wood Hall, 907 Pandora (entrance at 900 Johnson St.)
Wednesday, Aug. 29 @ 6 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 30 @ 9:15 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 1 @ 5:30 p.m.
$11 (plus $5 Fringe Visa Button)

John Grady brings stories of his relationship with his dog to life in Fear Factor: Canine Edition. Grady presents humorous and at times touching stories through monologues.

Martlet: Where did you get the idea or inspiration for your play?

John Grady: From being on a walkabout for 13 years with my dog Abby acting as copilot.

Martlet: If you could sum up your play in a sentence or phrase, what would it be?

JG: The true story of a man facing his ultimate fears … love, loss … and dog yoga.

Martlet: What is the worst experience you’ve had while performing?

JG: A fire alarm going off in the middle of the show.

Martlet: What is the best experience you’ve had while performing?

JG: A fire alarm going off in the middle of the show.

Martlet: If your character(s) could have actor(s) portray them in a film, who would they choose and why?

JG: I think I do a pretty good me … and I work for scale.

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